Last edited by Zulkisar
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Strange phenomena of New England: in the seventeenth century found in the catalog.

Strange phenomena of New England: in the seventeenth century

including the "Salem witchcraft," "1692." From the writings of "the Rev. Cotton Mather, D.D." ...

by Cotton Mather

  • 37 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Piercy and Reed in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • New England
    • Subjects:
    • Witchcraft -- New England -- Early works to 1800

    • Edition Notes

      StatementCollected and arranged for re-publication by Henry Jones ...
      GenreEarly works to 1800.
      ContributionsJones, Henry, ed.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBF1575 .M5
      The Physical Object
      Pagination54 p.
      Number of Pages54
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6529842M
      LC Control Number11008997
      OCLC/WorldCa10819875

      The laws in England in the seventeenth century covered several types of magical practices: it was a felony to conjure an evil spirit, to use witchcraft to injure a person, or to dig up corpses to use in spells. In addition to the laws against witchcraft, there was a large body of literature courts could draw on to help them identify and. By the spring of the jails were crowded with suspects, and before the hysteria at last subsided at the end of that year, twenty people had been executed for witchcraft—which was treated as a capital crime in seventeenth-century New England, as it was elsewhere in early modern Europe.

      Notes to The Wonders of the Invisible World Appendix 1: Emendations Appendix 2. Title Pages to the Seventeenth-Century Editions of Cotton Mather’s Wonders of the Invisible World Comprehensive Bibliography There have been many rather famous people within the world of the paranormal who have made a mark over the years. Some of these have shed light on new strange realms, while others have provided serious food for thought, and still others go in and document these phenomena, risking life and limb to physically make contact.

      In the late seventeenth century, the debate about mountains was given fresh impetus by the interventions of the theologian and philosopher Thomas Burnet (c. –). By the s, mountains featured in an all-out polemical war among some of England's best-known : Alexander Wragge-Morley. IN THE early seventeenth century, when Eng- lishmen began to plant permanent settlements in the New World, Captain John Smith made the acquaintance of some impressive Indians who lived on the Susquehanna River above Chesa-peake Bay. Smith portrayed them to an aston- ished book-buying world as giants. One of them.


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Strange phenomena of New England: in the seventeenth century by Cotton Mather Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book/Printed Material Strange phenomena of New England: in the seventeenth century: including the "Salem witchcraft," "" From the writings of "the Rev. Cotton Mather, D.D.". "Strange Phenomena of New England" is a fairly comprehensive series of primary source materials related to the Salem Witch Trials.

These range from preliminary works to legal proceedings and testimony from the trials themselves, to the final confession of the jurors themselves some time later, proclaiming that they had condemned the innocent and 5/5(2).

Strange phenomena of New England in the seventeenth century: including the "Salem witchcraft," "". Full text of "Strange phenomena of New England: in the seventeenth century: including the "Salem witchcraft," ""From the writings of "the Rev.

Cotton Mather, D.D.".". Download this stock image: Confession of Salem Jurors, a page from Strange Phenomena of New England In the Seventeenth Century, Including the Salem Witchcraft,from the writings of Cotton Mather.

Published in - G14WDN from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors. Strange phenomena of New England in the seventeenth century: including the "Salem witchcraft," "" / by: Mather, Cotton, Published: () Some miscellany observations on our present debates respecting witchcrafts: in a dialogue between S.

& B. / by: Willard, Samuel, rest of Hunt's book, primarily because of disproportionate reliance on northern sources. The best recent scholarship about the Susquehannocks in their relation to the Iroquois Indians of New York is scattered through Allen W.

Trelease, Indian Affairs in Colontial New York: The Seventeenth Century (Ithaca, N. Y., ). In the United States, one of the earliest documented cases of hurled stones coincides with the witchcraft hysteria which swept across New England during the 17 th Century. In a place called Great Island—today known as New Castle, New Hampshire—a tavern owned by George and Alice Walton became the center of strange activity in American Indian captivity narratives, accounts of men and women of European descent who were captured by Native Americans, were popular in both America and Europe from the 17th century until the close of the United States frontier late in the 19th century.

Mary Rowlandson's memoir, A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, () is a classic. Witchcraft at Salem book. Read 22 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Trial documents and contemporary narratives are used in this discussion of the practice of witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England.

Get A Copy. There have been many of cases of people that have acted strangely or said strange things. Many /5. God, War, and Providence: The Epic Struggle of Roger Williams and the Narragansett Indians against the Puritans of New England - Kindle edition by Warren, James A.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading God, War, and Providence: The Epic Struggle of Roger Williams and /5(32).

Well, this is really one of the great phenomena in 20th century physics. NARRATOR: The liquid helium had turned into a superfluid which displays some really odd properties.

Title page of 'Strange Phenomena of New England In the Seventeenth Century, Including the Salem Witchcraft, ,' from the writings of Cotton Mather.

Published in The contemporary woodcut from which illustrated a leaflet at that time, depicts the burning of three women accused of witchcraft in Derneburg. Dreams and the Invisible World in Colonial New England Ann Marie Plane Published by University of Pennsylvania Press Plane, Ann Marie.

Dreams and the Invisible World in Colonial New England: Indians, Colonists, and the Seventeenth by: 2. The Devil of Great Island will surely take its place among the must-read books on witchcraft in seventeenth-century New England.” —James Leamon, author of Revolution Downeast: The War for American Independence in MaineBrand: St.

Martin's Press. By Ed Simon. In early 20th-century St. Louis, Pearl Curran claimed to have conjured a long-dead New England puritan named Patience Worth through a Ouija board. Strange Phenomena of New England, in the Seventeenth Century Including the "Salem Witchcraft," "" by Cotton Mather Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland To Which Is Appended a Chapter on "the Ancient Races of Ireland" by Lady Wilde.

In the 17th century, a world wrecked by climate Geoffrey Parker’s unsettling new look at an earlier moment of upheaval By Hillary Rosner Globe Correspondent, July 7,a.m. cling the most bizarre phenomena were also being published in England, describing and illustrating themes that are known to have been extremely popular in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Britain, chiefly for their political and religious implications.9 In parallel, Golden Age Spain devoted a consider.

The Polyhistor was widely published, with editions in Italy fromthen in Paris inand numerous new editions appeared until the early seventeenth century, including that of Claude Saumaise in Thanks to this celebrated work, the scholars of the Renaissance and of the seventeenth century had access to this theory of the tides Author: Bernard Joly.

The book was published by Messrs. Macmillan in London in An American edition was published in by Messrs. Harper and Row, under the present title, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century.

The book enjoyed a modest success.The case of the ‘Drummer of Tedworth’ is one of the most famous episodes in the history of witchcraft. It involved a poltergeist which, in the early sixteen‐sixties, haunted the house of John Mompesson, a landowner, excise officer and commission officer in the militia, who lived at North Tidworth on the Wiltshire‐Hampshire border.1 In MarchMompesson intervened in the Cited by: What is missing, ultimately, in O Strange New World is the sense of an author who has peered beneath the surface of the society of his own time.

The scholar, like the citizen, must be prepared to recognize the vertigo of violence in the 20th as well as in the 17th century.